Irish essays made easy

Australian's planning a trip to Ireland are being urged to show caution while travelling overseas by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Nothing new there then! The default position of the department is to advise its own citizens to be careful whenever they travel anywhere overseas for business or pleasure. The spate of terrorist attacks across the middle East and increasingly in the West are reason enough to make public servants more anxious than normal and any incident of this kind that involves Australian citizens – and the general public are regularly targeted – means they will have to become involved in the aftermath and help clear up the carnage and mess caused by extremists. Read more...   Latest Book Reviews with Julia McDonnell Monday, 02 May 2016 00:00 PRIVATE PARIS
James Patterson & Mark Sullivan
If you are Patterson fan you are going to enjoy this roller coaster of a ride from the private salons of Saudi Princes through to the mean streets of LesBosquets. From breathtaking car chases to luxury yachts of Monaco the action is nonstop and fast paced. The next in the ‘Private’ series Jack Morgan head of a worldwide private investigation agency sets out to find a missing girl but finds himself embroiled in political intrigue that involves the murder of some of Paris’s cultural elite. Patterson shows us a glimpse into the darker aide of the ‘City of Lights’ and all the religious and ethnic tensions that bubble below the surface. Not normally a great fan of the short choppy way Patterson writes I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed finding myself swept up in this sometime thought provoking story. Easy reading…****

Because almost all the soldiers were first-generation emigrants, many claimants were actually still in Ireland and many of the marriages and births reported are Irish, in some cases reaching as far back as the early decades of the nineteenth century. This is particularly useful because large numbers of emigrants left from Western counties – Donegal, Mayo, Sligo, Galway – for which few early parish registers exist. I’ve already come across a marriage in Achonry parish in 1828, with townland addresses. That’s four decades before the start of the surviving Achonry registers.

The sun was now low beneath the horizon. Darkness spread rapidly. None of my selves could see anything beyond the tapering light of our headlamps on the hedge. I summoned them together. "Now," I said, "comes the season of making up our accounts. Now we have got to collect ourselves; we have got to be one self. Nothing is to be seen any more, except one wedge of road and bank which our lights repeat incessantly. We are perfectly provided for. We are warmly wrapped in a rug; we are protected from wind and rain. We are alone. Now is the time of reckoning. Now I, who preside over the company, am going to arrange in order the trophies which we have all brought in. Let me see; there was a great deal of beauty brought in to-day: farmhouses; cliffs standing out to sea; marbled fields; mottled fields; red feathered skies; all that. Also there was disappearance and the death of the individual. The vanishing road and the window lit for a second and then dark. And then there was the sudden dancing light, that was hung in the future. What we have made then to-day," I said, "is this: that beauty; death of the individual; and the future. Look, I will make a little figure for your satisfaction; here he comes. Does this little figure advancing through beauty, through death, to the economical, powerful and efficient future when houses will be cleansed by a puff of hot wind satisfy you? Look at him; there on my knee." We sat and looked at the figure we had made that day. Great sheer slabs of rock, tree tufted, surrounded him. He was for a second very, very solemn. Indeed it seemed as if the reality of things were displayed there on the rug. A violent thrill ran through us; as if a charge of electricity had entered in to us. We cried out together: "Yes, yes," as if affirming something, in a moment of recognition.

This is a four paged, laminated “fold-over” card, A4 in size. Its purpose is to get students to write the perfect essay “as Gaeilge” for the Leaving Certificate. It presents us with key phrases to open, close and fill paragraphs, an abundance of up-to-date vocabulary on all topical themes and a sprinkling of seanfhocail to add an Irish flavour to the essay. Aiste, D�osp�ireacht and �r�id are all covered. A must for every student !
Suitable for all Leaving Certificate students. (Higher Level)

Irish essays made easy

irish essays made easy

This is a four paged, laminated “fold-over” card, A4 in size. Its purpose is to get students to write the perfect essay “as Gaeilge” for the Leaving Certificate. It presents us with key phrases to open, close and fill paragraphs, an abundance of up-to-date vocabulary on all topical themes and a sprinkling of seanfhocail to add an Irish flavour to the essay. Aiste, D�osp�ireacht and �r�id are all covered. A must for every student !
Suitable for all Leaving Certificate students. (Higher Level)

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