Essay on death penalty is wrong

Another argument raised against the death penalty stems from the irreversible nature of the punishment. In this regard, Bradley (488) asserts that the death penalty is vulnerable to cases associated with wrongful executions and provides no room to review the conviction. In this regard, Bradley suggests alternative forms of punishment with equal severity such as life imprisonment without parole. These alternative forms of punishment provide reasonable grounds for the death penalty to be abolished. For instance, life imprisonment without parole is equally severe and addresses the loopholes associated with the death penalty such as wrongful convictions.

[1] Death Penalty Information Center, The Death Penalty in 2012: Year End Report, p. 6, Dec. 18, 2012. National Research Council, Deterrence and the Death Penalty, http:///?record_id=13363, 2012.
[2] American Samoa Government, Gov. Togiola wants to repeal the death penalty; law has no method of execution and not the right thing to do, http:////news-bottom/163-gov-togiola-wants-to-repeal-the-death-penalty-law-has-no-method-of-execution-and-not-the-right-thing-to-do, Jul. 10, 2012.

Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde , Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica , Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic , Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic , Ecuador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Holy See, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kiribati, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Marshall Islands , Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand , Nicaragua, Niue, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Rwanda, Samoa, San Marino , Sao Tome And Principe, Senegal, Serbia (including Kosovo), Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands , South Africa , Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Timor-Leste, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Kingdom , Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela.

Furman v. Georgia Court Case (the Supreme Court reviewed this case and also included the similar cases Gregg v. Georgia, Jurek v. Texas and Proffitt v. Florida)
The US Supreme Court found the DP laws to be unconstitutional. The laws were deemed cruel and unusual punishment which is in violation of the 8th Amendment of our Constitution: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted ." The Supreme Court felt allowing a jury to decide sentencing could yield arbitrary results which would not be fair to the defendant and amount to "cruel and unusual punishment." To counteract this, states wrote new laws providing sentencing guidelines to the jury and to the judge. "Aggravating" and "mitigating" circumstances were added to crimes to help the juries and judges decide who should get the DP. The DP laws were also found to violate the 14th Amendment, the right to due process. Supreme Court justices believed defendants should not be sentenced to death immediately, during the same deliberations that found them guilty, but should get a separate sentencing phase. The Supreme Court also started the practice of allowing a death sentence an automatic appeal. This helps the state's maintain a fair standard of death sentences by reviewing each DP case in the state's appellate courts.

Essay on death penalty is wrong

essay on death penalty is wrong

Furman v. Georgia Court Case (the Supreme Court reviewed this case and also included the similar cases Gregg v. Georgia, Jurek v. Texas and Proffitt v. Florida)
The US Supreme Court found the DP laws to be unconstitutional. The laws were deemed cruel and unusual punishment which is in violation of the 8th Amendment of our Constitution: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted ." The Supreme Court felt allowing a jury to decide sentencing could yield arbitrary results which would not be fair to the defendant and amount to "cruel and unusual punishment." To counteract this, states wrote new laws providing sentencing guidelines to the jury and to the judge. "Aggravating" and "mitigating" circumstances were added to crimes to help the juries and judges decide who should get the DP. The DP laws were also found to violate the 14th Amendment, the right to due process. Supreme Court justices believed defendants should not be sentenced to death immediately, during the same deliberations that found them guilty, but should get a separate sentencing phase. The Supreme Court also started the practice of allowing a death sentence an automatic appeal. This helps the state's maintain a fair standard of death sentences by reviewing each DP case in the state's appellate courts.

Media:

essay on death penalty is wrongessay on death penalty is wrongessay on death penalty is wrongessay on death penalty is wrong